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20131202
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Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
the documents that were leaked by edward snowden. the national security agency tracked the locations of up to 5 billion overseas cell phone calls, including those belonging to americans. the tracking picks up the names of the people the users are calling. it does not gather data on american cell phones inside the u.s. >>> president obama is wading into the minimum wage debate, as it grabs a spotlight today in cities coast-to-coast. president obama cled on congress to increase the federal minimum wage. he pressed for an extension to jobless benefits to over a million long-term unemployed people. they expire three days after christmas. >>> meantime, fast food workers across the country will have their say today. they're staging another round of walkouts for higher pay. among the demands, a $15 an hour minimum wage and the right to unionize. experts say such a pay increase could push up fast food costs by about 20%. put another way, the cost of a $3 hamburger could rise to around $3.50. >>> universal pictures is shutting down production on "fast & furious 7," to figure out how to proceed with the
be under surveillancy the n.s.a. they said the national security agency is tracking 5 billion cell phones every day. the paper cited documents from edward snowden. it means the spy agency could track the movement of almost any cell phone around the world. n.s.a. officials refused to comment, but said they don't collect data on sell phones in the united states. >>> tonight a new meningitis outbreak at the university of california, santa barbara o initials are racing to stop the bacteria spreading. brian rooney has more. >> four students at this cancer developed a rare form of meningitis in three weeks. one in four who catch it dee. 20% suffer permanent damage. >> when the outbreak started, when we had three cases two weeks ago, three cases in two weeks was a dangerous situation. >> a student, a freshman la cross player had such a serious case that both his feet had to be amputated. >> once it causes bloodpoichg, sepsis can be so overwelcoming, the body is tox. >>, and hand and feet are overwhelmed with infection andar amputated. >> students you warned to avoid close contact, sharing drinks
to restrict the surveillance by the national security agency? >> i would like to apply the fourth amendment to third party records. so when i have a contract with a phone company, i think those are still my records and you can look at them if you're from the government if you ask a judge. a warrant applies to one person. not to everyone in america. it's absolutely against the spirit and the letter of the fourth amendment to say that a judge can write one warrant and you can get every phone call in america and that's what's happening. i think it's wrong. it goes against everything america stands for and i will help to fight that all the way to the support. we need to get the supreme court to re-examine our records. >> so, you would ban if you could, all mass data mining. >> i'm for going after terrorists with every tool we have. i'm not opposed to the nsa, to spying, but i am infavor of the fourth amendment. if you think someone's a terrorist, you call a judge, get a warrant. if that's person's called 100 people, you get 100 more warrants. if they've called 10,000 people, you've got to get 1
stuki showed this image national security agency world of war craft. >> oh my goodness. appreciate it, thank you. >>> let's see on wall street stocks are slightly higher at the close. the dow edging up almost 6 points, the s&p 500 hitting a new record high. investors are waiting for new clues we are told about whether the federal reserve will start winding down its massive economic stimulus program. >>> there is a new airline in the skies today. american airlines and u.s. air completed their merger forming the largest air carrier. four airlines now cover 80% of u.s. air flights. >>> gas prices are up. the lundberg survey says the price per gallon rose 3 cents in the last two weeks, average for regular is $3.29. jeremy is a financial writer with zacks investment service. >> pleasure, man. >> american airlines and u.s. airways have locked up this merger. what's it going to mean jarrod for flying public for you for me for all of us? >> as a pilot myself i'm pretty close to the industry and i obviously travel quite a bit. i spent last year traveling just weekly. what's interesting is when
. and the "washington post" reported the national security agency collects roughly five billion records a day on the location of cell phones worldwide, based on documents leaked by former n.s.a. contractor edward snowden. >> woodruff: on the "newshour" online right now, archaeologists have discovered that we're all mutts. new tests on the oldest-known human d.n.a. reveal that homo sapiens have more ancestors than we had previously thought. read about that on our science page. all that and more is on our website newshour.pbs.org. >> ifill: and that's the "newshour" for tonight. on thursday, fast-food workers plan strikes in 100 cities across the country to protest low-wages. i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. we'll see you online and again here tomorrow evening. for all of us here at the "pbs newshour," thank you and good night. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie calle
. >>> new details about how the national security agency gathers nearly 5 billion cell phone records around the world every day. those records are put into a huge database that contract the movements of individuals, map their relationships, how they're connected work they're calling were creates a web of information. >> bringing in our pentagon correspondent, barbara starr, on this story because, barbara, you hear about all of this, the cell phone locations and who they're trying to trace, is it americans, americans living abroad, how expansive is this, if you're overseas and you're on the phone? >> reporter: well, we don't know a lot about how expansive it is. "the washington post" reporting that this all came from more leaks by, guess who, edward snowden and documents that he had, and that is it about 5 billion cell phone records a day. how much does it affect americans? well, by all accounts, if you're an american, you're out of the country on business or may vation, you pick up your cell phone, use it, that call that record of that call, not the conversation itself, is most likely to be
commerce, national security agency, this is never happening. >> security implications of this challenging. with respect to security, there are requirements for checking out the background of persons who operate these vehicles, delivery systems in addition to delivering the 9 packages to your front door they could deliver small weapons benign pa your front door they could deliver small weapons systems. this will be challenge dennis: getting a lot of pr out of this. thanks for being with us. cheryl: after a terrible date have you ever wanted to warn other women or men about going out with zak person? now there is an apps for doing that. we should explain what this is, just for women. >> an application that is wildly popular that allows women to rate men and not only raid them but on a 1-10 scale. the issue is there are privacy concerns, reputation concerns. i talked to the lulu ceo about a lot of these, what the numbers are behind it. >> we are just focusing, we are very young so we are focused on building the best possible experience moving into new verticals, new markets and trying to rea
.remely other concerns involved in the u.s., has a national security agencies monitoring and mitigation scheme to diplomatic relations between colombia and the u.s.? -- monitoring communications, kate e maddock between clinton and the u.s.? between colombia and the u.s.? >> we share with the u.s. and other intelligence agencies all of the information in there for spied therefore if we had on our common enemies, it has been done with the cooperation of the colombian authorities and u.s. authorities. information off spying outside that spirit of cooperation. if i knew about that, of course i would condemn it immediately. >> some of your neighbors in latin america have been furious by revelations of u.s. eavesdropping. is there anger justified? >> nobody likes to be spied. , if some and spies on you, you have all the right to get mad. they are spying without permission. to china, china's investment in latin america continues to grow. the country signed bilateral agreements last week. can you tell us more about that columbia-china economic relationship? do you see the effect it would have on that
a lot in. good to see you. >> thanks. >>> time to show you headlines. the national security agents is not alone in collecting cell phone data. it's used by local and state police. public records show dozens of agencies grab information from phones while in use. >>> in california the american held in north korea made it home. 85-year-old newman spent six weeks of detention in a comfortable hotel. he says he ate well and was bored at times. newman was detained during the ten day visit to north korea. he was freed friday after reading the apology for his you service during the korean war. >>> los angeles times says many attended the memorial for paul walker. walker was the star of "fast & furious" movies. he was k >>> that cold arctic air continues to settle in over the bay area, at least a couple more days here before we start to warm things up. as we look out over the golden gate bridge, mostly clear skies now and going the stay that way all day long, but the temperatures are going to be chilly. by the afternoon, highs expected in the upper 40s and the
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)